Industrial Heating Furnaces and their Types...

Industrial Heating Furnaces and their Types A furnace is equipment which is used as a reactor, or for melting of metals for casting, or to heat materials to change their shape (e.g. rolling, forging etc.) or properties (heat treatment). Industrial furnaces are mainly used for carrying out the process or for the purpose of heating. Furnaces which are used for carrying out the processes are sometimes known as reactors. Industrial furnaces which do not ‘show colour’, that is, in which the temperature is below 650 deg C are sometimes called ‘ovens’. However, the dividing line between ovens and furnaces is not very sharp. As an example, coke ovens operate at temperatures above 1400 deg C. In the ceramic industry, furnaces are called ‘kilns’. In the petrochemical and chemical process industries, furnaces are termed ‘heaters’, ‘kilns’, ‘afterburners’, ‘incinerators’, or ‘destructors’. The furnace of a boiler is known as its ‘firebox’ or ‘combustion chamber. Industrial heating furnaces are insulated enclosures designed to deliver heat to loads for many forms of heat processing. Furnaces used as reactors, and melting furnaces require very high temperatures and can involve erosive and corrosive conditions. Shaping operations need high temperatures to soften materials for processes such as forging, swaging, rolling, pressing, bending, and extruding etc. Heat treating operations need midrange temperatures to physically change crystalline structures or chemically (metallurgically) alter surface compounds, including hardening or relieving strains in metals, or modifying their ductility. These include aging, annealing, normalizing, tempering, austenitizing, carburizing, hardening, malleabilizing, nitriding, sintering, spheroidizing, and stress relieving etc. Industrial processes which use low temperatures include drying, coating, polymerizing, and chemical changes etc. Industrial heating operations encompass a wide range of temperatures, which depend partly on the material being heated and partly on the purpose of the heating process and...

Product Quality and its Management...

Product Quality and its Management Product quality is the group of features and characteristics which determines the capacity of the product to meet the specification requirements of a standard or of a customer. It is often defined as ‘the ability to fulfill the customer’s needs and expectations’. It is also sometimes defined as ‘meeting specifications at the lowest possible cost’ as well as ‘delivering the value that a customer derives from a product’. Product quality needs to be defined firstly in terms of parameters or characteristics, which vary from product to product. The quality of the product can be controlled during its manufacturing and it makes the product free from deficiency and defects. A specification is the minimum requirement according to which the producer makes and delivers the product to the customer. In setting specification limits, the following is required to be considered. The user’s and/or customer’s needs Requirements provided for in national and/or international standards Requirements of specifications of national and/or international standards with restrictions to meet specific needs of the customer The competitor’s product specifications, in order to gain marketing advantages Brand related requirements of the product. Requirements relating to product safety and health hazards provided for in the statutory and regulatory requirements As described above, the product quality is the ability to satisfy the stated needs. From this definition, product quality can be described by nine dimensions or characteristics. These nine dimensions are as follows. Performance – It is the product’s primary operating characteristics. Product is to give expected performance during its use. Product features – The product is to meet the requirements of its features. For example a rebar is to have two longitudinal ribs and several cross ribs at specific intervals. Reliability – It is the probability of the...

Behaviour of Iron and Steel Materials during Tensile Testing Aug28

Behaviour of Iron and Steel Materials during Tensile Testing...

Behaviour of Iron and Steel Materials during Tensile Testing The mechanical properties of iron and steels are often assessed through tensile testing. The testing technique is well standardized and can be conducted economically with a minimum of equipment. Since iron and steel materials are being utilized in structural applications, they are to have tensile properties which meet the requirements of the relevant codes and standards. These requirements in the code and standards are the minimum strength and ductility levels. Due to this, information available from tensile testing is often underutilized. However, direct examination of many of the metallurgical interactions which influence the results of tensile testing can considerably improve the usefulness of the testing data. Examination of these interactions, and correlation with metallurgical / material /application variables such as heat treatment, surface finish, test environment, stress state, and anticipated thermo-mechanical exposures, can lead to significant improvements in both the efficiency and the quality of utilization of iron and steel materials in the engineering applications. Tensile testing of iron and steel materials is done for many reasons. Tensile properties are normally included in material specification to ensure quality and are often used to predict the behaviour of these materials during different forms of loading other than uniaxial tension. The result of tensile testing is normally used in the selection of these materials for engineering uses. It provides a relatively easy and cheap technique for developing mechanical property data for the selection, qualification, and utilization of these materials in engineering applications. This data is generally used to establish the suitability of these materials for a particular application, and/or to provide a basis for comparison with other substitute materials. The elastic moduli of iron and steel materials are dependent on the rate at which the test sample...

Pipe and Tubular Products of Steel...

Pipe and Tubular Products of Steel The term pipe and tubular product of steel is the used to cover all hollow products of steel. These products are normally produced in cylindrical shape. However, they are frequently altered by different processing methods to produce square, oval, rectangular, and other symmetrical forms. Pipe and tubular products have a large number of applications, but they are most commonly used for conveying of fluids and as structural members. Steel pipe and tubular products are normally produced from wrought carbon (C) or alloy constructional steels and are usually designated by the terms pipe, specialty tubing, and oil country tubular goods (OCTG) etc. Pipes and tubular products have an outside dimension, an inside dimension and the wall thickness as shown in Fig 1. Fig 1 Dimensions of pipe and tubular products The steel pipe and tubular products are usually classified broadly as (i) pipe, and (ii) tube. The application of the terms pipe and tube is not always consistent. The term pipe is normally used to describe cylindrical products made to standard combinations of outside diameter and wall thickness. The main difference between a pipe and a tube is the way the diameter of the pipe or tube is designated. Pipe is normally designated by a “Nominal Pipe Size” based upon the ID (inside diameter) of the most common wall thickness while the tube is designated by the measured OD (outside diameter). As an example a 20 mm steel pipe with 4 mm thickness has an OD of 28 mm while a 20 mm steel tube has an OD of 20mm.  The two broad classifications of steel pipe and tubular products are subdivided into several named use groups. As an example, the term tube covers three such groups namely (i)...

Data Analysis and Management of Steel Organization...

Data Analysis and Management of Steel Organization A steel organization is very complex in nature. In such an organization, there are a large number of units working in conjunction with each other and there are a large variety of processes taking place simultaneously at all the times, generating huge amount of data. This large quantity of data need to be coordinated, collected, integrated, and analyzed for decision making in order to ensure the smooth running of the processes and units, as well as for the proper functioning of the steel organization. Hence data plays a very important role in efficient management of the steel organization. The speed and quality of the data analysis provide ultimately the steel organization the efficiency as well as a competitive advantage. Further while the majority of the data is generated internally in the organization, some of the data comes to the organization from the sources which are external to the organization. The generated data in the steel organization are worthless in a vacuum unless its potential value is unlocked and leveraged to drive the decision making in the organization. To enable such evidence based decision making, the steel organization needs efficient processes to turn high volumes of fast-moving and diverse data into meaningful insights. The overall process of extracting insights from the large data can be broken down into five stages (Fig 1).  These five stages are (i) acquisition and recording, (ii) extraction cleaning and annotation, (iii) integration, aggregation and representation, (iv) modeling and analysis, and (v) interpretation. These five stages form the two main sub-processes namely (i) data management, and (ii) analysis. Data management involves processes and supporting technologies to acquire and store data and to prepare and retrieve it for analysis. Analysis, on the other hand, refers...